Minnesota Day One Crisis Hotline

Conference Workshop Descriptions

Cornerstone’s 10th Midwest Conference on Interpersonal Violence and Abuse
November 8 and 9, 2018
Doubletree by Hilton, Bloomington, Minnesota

Workshop Descriptions

Thursday, November 8
Workshop Block 1
1:15-2:45 pm

1) Victim and Officer Safety: Lt. Mark Wynn

This workshop exposes attendees to the reality and impact of violence committed against victims and police officers. Workshop attendees will learn the number of officers killed in the line of duty and the “Most Dangerous” duties for police over the past ten years. Lt. Wynn will also discuss the common characteristics of a domestic violence offender and common denominators in assessing the lethal risk to victims and officers.

2) Introduction to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and Trauma-Informed Care: Jane Straub, Gundersen National Child Protection Training Center

Experiences in childhood matter. Numerous research studies have shown how childhood stress and trauma can impact adult health. The ACE Study investigates the health and social effects of negative childhood experiences. The cycle of violence, generational poverty and abuse, homelessness, substance abuse, incarceration, perpetration and victimization of violence are all related to ACE’s. Now that we have the research, what can we do about it? Changing the negative course that many children are on is our best way to prevent abuse in future generations. Strategies such as identification and assessment, reducing risk and exposure and nurturing resiliency and skill building are effective interventions. This presentation will increase your knowledge of trauma and provide ways to work with children, families and communities to reduce the impact of trauma.

Learning Objectives:
• Learn to identify types of childhood adversity and the link to health in adulthood.
• Recognize how a child’s stress response system activates fight, flight or fear and becomes conditioned over time, especially in high stress situations.
• Learn ways to build resiliency in your clientele.
• Understand the concept of trauma-informed care and how it creates safety for those impacted by violence and trauma.

3) Decoding Rape Culture: Challenging Narratives that Normalize Sexual Violence: Tyler Osterhaus, Cornerstone

Within the sexual violence prevention movement, it is widely understood that gender-based violence and other forms of oppression are woven into the fabric of our cultural construct. This workshop will utilize multimedia, storytelling, performance art and audience interaction to introduce participants to basic media literacy concepts to develop skills for decoding Rape Culture. Workshop attendees will explore how media and media-based activities can be used to create transformative learning opportunities to spark “Aha” moments that will ultimately help us invoke a new reality of Consent Culture.

 

Thursday, November 8
Workshop Block 2
3-4:30 pm

4) Domestic Violence and the Elderly: Lt. Mark Wynn

Workshop attendees will learn the investigative techniques of identifying domestic elder abuse. Lt. Wynn will discuss how to identify the abuser, victim assistance for the elderly, interview techniques, and the partnership between law enforcement and elder abuse advocates.

5) The Family Court Enhancement Project and A SAFeR Approach to Cases Involving Intimate Partner Violence and Children: Nancy Ver Steegh, Battered Women’s Justice Project

Because domestic violence comes in many forms, the most effective practitioners seek to tailor their responses to individual perpetrators and victims by assessing the nature and context of the abuse and its effects on adult victims and children. These assessments can be quite challenging, but recent developments in the field have made it easier and more reliable. This session introduces attendees to “SAFeR”, a four-pronged approach to producing safer, more workable outcomes in domestic violence-related cases involving children. While the SAFeR approach can be utilized by any kind of practitioner, Hennepin County’s Family Court Enhancement Project has been focusing for four years on organizing family court practitioners to implement this approach in child custody and parenting matters, including OFPs. Professor Ver Steegh has been consulting with the Battered Women’s Justice Project as it developed this approach and its practitioner guides and tools, and has been providing technical assistance to Hennepin County and the other three FCEP sites nationwide. She will share her expertise and insights in this interactive and practical session exploring how SAFeR can assist practitioners to better respond to domestic violence.

Learning Objectives: Following this workshop, participants will be better able to:
• Apply a systematic, behaviorally-specific method of recognizing and understanding the nature and context of domestic violence
• Analyze the impact of domestic violence on victims, children, parenting and co-parenting
• Develop individualized responses that account for the context and implications of domestic violence
• Describe and consider for adoption the practices developed by Hennepin County and other jurisdictions nationwide as part of their work on the Family Court Enhancement Project

6) Developing a Response to Youth Victims of Labor Trafficking: Amanda Colegrove, Minnesota Department of Health and Madeline Lohman, The Advocates for Human Rights

Labor trafficking occurs throughout the Midwest and many agencies and organizations have been increasing their understanding and responses to this violent crime and human rights violation. In spring 2018, The Advocates for Human Rights and the Minnesota Department of Health published a protocol on Minnesota’s response to youth victims of labor trafficking. The protocol covers many of the sectors that interact with victims of labor trafficking–law enforcement, child protection, legal services, victim advocates, health care providers, and more. This presentation will discuss labor trafficking (i.e., definitions, dynamics, risk factors, and identification) and examine Minnesota’s response to labor trafficking as a model for other states. Attendees will learn best practices in working with victims through interactive case studies and discuss ways that participants can improve multi-jurisdictional responses to labor trafficking.

Friday, November 9
Workshop Block 3
9-10:30 am

7) The Neurobiology of Trauma: Understanding Victim Behavior: Olga Trujillo

In this workshop Olga will combine her lived experience of violence with the science behind the impact of trauma and violence on the brain to help attendees explore how they may enhance their trauma-informed responses. This interactive workshop that will examine the struggle that criminal justice professionals face in handling domestic violence, sexual assault and child abuse cases and explore efforts to improve their ability to investigate these cases and assess credibility.

8) Prevalence and Characteristics of Intimate Partner Rape (IPR) Among Domestic Violence and Sexual Offenders, Part 1 of 2: Merve Davies

Based on the research attention to Intimate Partner Rape (IPR), it appears that it is thought IPR occurs infrequently in domestic violence situations. Clinicians have observed that many offenders participating in treatment for domestic violence or sexual offenses often engage in similar acts of interpersonal violence. Specifically, domestic violence offenders also sexually assault their partners and sexual offenders have engaged in acts of physical violence.

In 2009, Davies and Simons examined the prevalence of and attitudes toward intimate partner rape among offenders who have been convicted of domestic violence, rape and child sexual abuse. Their discoveries unveil several disturbing findings about the prevalence of IPR. While criminal justice programs are aware of these behaviors, they do little to prevent IPR. Domestic violence has a long history of being viewed as nuisance cases and offenders not being dangerous. This workshop will challenge beliefs, demonstrate the cross-over between domestic violence and sex crimes, and offer suggestions for how to engage a better systematic response to this serious problem.

9) Intimate Partner Violence and Co-Occurring Substance Use Disorders: Vanessa Kissinger and Tim Gregory, Progress Valley
Many episodes of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) involve substance use. High levels of substance use increase the likelihood and severity of physical violence. This workshop will review data on the prevalence of substance use in IPV, the importance of substance use treatment in addressing violence, and discuss substance use treatment services available in Minnesota and how to access them.

Friday, November 9
Workshop Block 4
10:45 am-12:15 pm

10) Health Care after Violence: Olga Trujillo

Taking care of your health can be a challenge for any woman. A woman who has experienced violence may find caring for her health even more complicated. Many survivors of violence find it almost impossible to go to the doctor, dentist or other specialists. They may experience difficulties with the power imbalance, with being physically vulnerable, with the clinical setting or with the acts of treatment themselves.
In this workshop, Olga Trujillo will illustrate how she discovered the importance of becoming proactive in her health care through her own experience of violence and coping. She will detail the steps that she took with the health care professionals in her life to have them partner with her in caring for her health.

Through this presentation we will explore how advocates and other professionals who work with survivors of violence can assist survivors. We will also explore how violence and our coping mechanisms make it harder to actively care for our health. We will also examine why it is so important to make sure we do.

11) Prevalence and Characteristics of Intimate Partner Rape (IPR) Among Domestic Violence and Sexual Offenders, Part 2 of 2: Merve Davies

Based on the research attention to IPR, it appears that it is thought IPR occurs infrequently in domestic violence situations. However, clinicians have observed that many offenders participating in treatment for domestic violence or sexual offenses often engage in similar acts of interpersonal violence. Specifically, domestic violence offenders also sexually assault their partners and sexual offenders have engaged in acts of physical violence.

In 2009, Davies and Simons examined the prevalence of and attitudes toward intimate partner rape among offenders who have been convicted of domestic violence, rape, and child sexual abuse. Participants consisted of 101 sexual offenders and 148 domestic violence offenders, who were receiving specialized treatment in the community. The discoveries related to this research offer several disturbing findings about the prevalence of IPR. While criminal justice programs are aware of these behaviors, they do little to prevent IPR. Domestic violence has a long history of being viewed as nuisance cases and offenders not being dangerous. This workshop will challenge beliefs of participants, demonstrate the cross-over between domestic violence and sex crimes, and offer suggestions for how to engage a better systematic response to this serious problem.

12) Trauma Across Generations: Domestic Violence and the African American Community: Samuel Simmons

This workshop will explore the link between historical trauma and challenges to effectively addressing domestic violence in the African American community. The workshop will also discuss practical culturally-sensitive trauma-informed outcome-driven best and/or promising practices.

• Workshop attendees will gain insights on the importance of both practitioners and the community being aware of the link between historical trauma and current challenges when addressing domestic violence in the African American community.
• Attendees will learn about trauma-informed best and/or promising culturally-sensitive practices to be considered to improve outcomes; they will also gain an understanding of the importance of being aware of policies, perceptions and bias that could have unintended consequences for the African American community.